Super solar telescopes, seafloor explorations, human-technology partnerships: NSF looks ahead!

What big breakthroughs or new developments is NSF looking forward to in 2020 and beyond? Here’s what some of our experts had to say … “I have watched in amazement as the cars and trucks I dreamed of driving as a little girl have changed over time. They are loaded with technology that grew from basic … Continue reading Super solar telescopes, seafloor explorations, human-technology partnerships: NSF looks ahead!

Deep Dive with Alvin: 7 Things to Know Before You Go

Don’t even think about bringing the whole family. NSF-funded deep-sea submersible Alvin, allows researchers to observe and collect data for more than two-thirds of the ocean floor. With Alvin’s help, NSF-funded researchers will continue to discover and understand the secrets of the deep. Check out the things you need to know before you go on … Continue reading Deep Dive with Alvin: 7 Things to Know Before You Go

Meeting the power of catastrophic environmental events through education

Doppler radar destroyed by Hurricane Maria / Photo credit: Luis Suárez In 2017, Hurricane Maria plowed through Puerto Rico and devastated the island’s infrastructure, causing widespread power and telecommunication outages. The devastation and suffering led faculty at the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) to brainstorm ways to prevent future damages from natural events such as … Continue reading Meeting the power of catastrophic environmental events through education

NSF-funded researchers well represented among 2019 Nobel prize winners

The 2019 Nobel Prizes have been announced, and, once again, researchers who have received NSF funding are among the Nobel laureates. Half the share of the physics prize went to James Peebles. Two of the three winners in chemistry -- John B. Goodenough and M. Stanley Whittingham -- have received funding from NSF. And the … Continue reading NSF-funded researchers well represented among 2019 Nobel prize winners

Structure and infrastructure: Preparing for next-gen optical astronomy

Today’s night skies may be similar to those that Galileo Galilei observed in the 1600s, but that is where the state of optical astronomy’s similarities end. Since Galileo first recorded his observations of the Moon, Jupiter and the Milky Way in a 1610 edition of The Starry Messenger, telescopes have grown, adaptive optics have allowed … Continue reading Structure and infrastructure: Preparing for next-gen optical astronomy